11 thoughts on “Reblog: White Racism | The Exclusivity of White Freedom

  1. I really think this issue is about distribution of wealth, not race. There are uber wealthy individuals of every ethnic and racial background who are just as oppressive as rich whites. Examples? Take the USSC — Ginsburg was an advocate for the poor and Thomas part of the opposition to her. “Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Just replace the word, power, with money.

    Like

      1. Yes, I did. Each of us approaches each day’s events from the perspective of a framework that we have constructed about how the world works. The extreme cases are obvious and usually the but of jokes — the “flat earthers”, the “covid is a hoaxers”, those types. But we all do it to a greater or lesser degree. Like a doctor doing a superficial exam, we read things as we expect to see them. That’s why so many have trouble with the notion that some really are color-blind. Or why gays tend to reject bis and tgs.

        And what I’m saying, following Becker’s thesis, is that skin color is an excuse for restricting wealth, not the cause. It used to be said that a lot of rich blacks “went white” and that was wrong. They went “rich.” Poor whites should be natural allies of poor minorities as they share common problems. Racism was promoted to prevent that from happening.

        Like

      2. There’s no option to reply to Vic for some reason, but I would like to say I disagree with him.

        I come from a country with a slave history and a diverse population that does not have the problems America does. Our government officials actually look like the population and the same goes for our wealthy class.

        In other words, no one race owns everything and runs everything with a few token minorities as diversity talking points for the pull yourself up by the bootstrap folks. We are also separated by class, not race or ethnicity. I can choose my class; I cannot choose my race. That makes Jamaica more of a meritocracy than America.

        By the closing statement of Vic’s comment, I gather he doesn’t understand what I wrote. I think you also subtly questioned whether he understood when you asked if he read the whole thing.

        I think he has fallen into the trap he mentioned of not being able to understand someone else’s approach. The first two words of the title was quite literally “White racism”. That racism is the cause instead of skin colour was never up for debate.

        If we were to have a discussion on whether someone achieved less or deserves less freedom specifically because of the colour of their skin, then the discussion would be whether people are inherently lesser human beings because of their race. That is an entirely different conversation and a rather racist one.

        I think if, like Liz, he walked into the conversation with questions and a listening ear instead of theories and talking points, he would have a better chance of understanding.

        Like

      3. There’s no option to reply to Vic for some reason, but I would like to say I disagree with him.

        I come from a country with a slave history and a diverse population that does not have the problems America does. Our government officials actually look like the population and the same goes for our wealthy class.

        In other words, no one race owns everything and runs everything with a few token minorities as diversity talking points for the pull yourself up by the bootstrap folks. We are also separated by class, not race or ethnicity. I can choose my class; I cannot choose my race. That makes Jamaica more of a meritocracy than America.

        By the closing statement of Vic’s comment, I gather he doesn’t understand what I wrote. I think you also subtly questioned whether he understood when you asked if he read the whole thing.

        I think he has fallen into the trap he mentioned of not being able to understand someone else’s approach. The first two words of the title were quite literally “White racism”. That racism is the cause instead of skin colour was never up for debate.

        If we were to have a discussion on whether someone achieved less or deserves less freedom specifically because of the colour of their skin, then the discussion would be whether people are inherently lesser human beings because of their race. That is an entirely different conversation and a rather racist one.

        I think if, like Liz, he walked into the conversation with questions and a listening ear instead of theories and talking points, he would have a better chance of understanding.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve been lucky enough to have a friend at work that I can talk to about such things – we started with hair. It honestly had never occurred to me what Black women do to have the hair they think is “good”. I’ve just always taken it for granted that the stuff grows on your head, and you color or perm it. Not even close for them. Seems like a small thing to be starting with, but don’t we all have an idealized version of ourselves. Now imagine making that 100 times harder and more expensive.
    I’m facing the fact that I’m not as “woke” as I though I was. It’s unsettling, but I’m going to keep pushing through that discomfort.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Liz! I’m glad you’re taking the time to listen and learn instead of kicking down the front door with your own preconceived notions. I find that’s the greatest difficulty with getting through to White people in America. They are stubborn. They enter these conversations with their own theories and think they already have the causes and the solutions figured out.

      There’s no reasoning with someone like that. They’re only looking for confirmation bias. Keep listening and keep asking questions.

      Also, I wrote a post about Black hair that Ruth might remember from several years ago. You might enjoy it: https://alexischateau.com/2016/05/04/translating-becky-with-the-good-hair/

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi Alexis! I confess, I’m hella stubborn, but I’m pushing through my own ideas. I mean heck, I only have my own pair of eyes, and they don’t see everything! Starting there, and going forward is what’s keeping me looking for ways to have these assumptions kicked to the curb. And, if I’m really lucky, this will help.

        I do ask questions – and listen to the conversations about skin tone and where in the Black Community people that aren’t a part of that community are making money off of people who are. It’s difficult, I really wanted to believe that we’re a lot further towards equality as a nation.

        Loved the post – and again, learned a lot. Loving who we are, as we are should be something that we all get to do, instead of having it be hammered in by publicity.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I think you’re on the right path, Liz. I see accountability in your words. That’s that first step a lot of people won’t take. I think, from there, the rest is much easier. I’m glad you enjoyed the post! Keep asking questions. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.